A day in Seville

A day in Seville

I missed writing this post because the days are so full that I am too tired at night to write. That’s the brief summary of our trip to Seville, which was fine too because I didn’t like it. We had a half day walking tour arranged to see the Alcazar Royal, a place / fortress built in the 10th century by the Moors and rebuilt by Peter 1 and later on. This is a copy of the Alhambra which was built by 5000 workers. The thought that ran through my head was why would anyone need all this? Then we walked through what was once a Jewish crossroad, home to 5,000 Jews in the 1300s but now called the Barrio Santa Cruz or the Holy Cross (not a subtle change) and heard the story of the Jews who lived there so that the religious leaders can protect them. but were killed in the pogrom because they did not die because of the Bubonic plague and that was all before the Inquisition. There are no synagogues in Seville now and the guide thinks maybe 50 Jews live here. This guide is quite important in telling the story. That bothered me a lot. Then we went to the … the cathedral


Check the gardens in the Alcazar. Check the gardens in the Alcazar
Look around the park at the Alcazar
the largest gothic church in the world, built in 1192 as a mosque but converted into a church. It was an extraordinary decoration and even housed 20% of the remains of Christopher Columbus and 100% of his sons. Now that’s a claim of fame to be proud of. The guide seemed to go on and about minute details from the cathedral and we were all cold and tired. It was a relief to get out of there and into the sun.
From there we walked to Plaza de Toros … yes, bullfights are still happening here, fortunately not all this year but we heard about the history of this ‘sport’ and walked out into the ring itself.